Bryant Terry taps Michael W. Twitty for the second MoAD Diaspora Dinner Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Museum of the African Diaspora and Chef-in-Residence Bryant Terry present the 2017 Diaspora Dinner
An evening with Culinary & Cultural Historian, Michael W. Twitty Celebrating his new book The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African-American Culinary History in the Old South.

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Tuesday, August 29
6:30pm The Museum Champagne & small bites 7:15pm Procession to the St. Regis 7:30pm A dining and cultural experience weaving a multi-course meal created by Chefs Twitty and Terry, inspired by African-American food traditions; lively conversation with Chef Twitty & food writer, Stephen Satterfield; and the musical collage of Jazz and Soul vocalist, Valerie Troutt.

“In addition to Twitty being a brilliant writer, he is a Black, openly gay, progressive Jew – pretty much the reason G-d created the Bay Area – the true embodiment of the diaspora.”
Chef-in-Residence Bryant Terry
$250 Includes signed copy of The Cooking Gene. Seating is limited.
Proceeds benefit the artistic programs of the Museum of the African Diaspora.

TIckets at 2017diasporadinner.eventbrite.com

For more on the Chef-in-Residence program, visit moadsf.org/chef-in-residence/

Michael W. Twitty

y450-293-2Michael’s work is a braid of two distinct brands: the Antebellum Chef and Kosher/Soul. Antebellum Chef represents the vast number of unknown Black cooks across the Americas that were essential in the creation of the creole cuisines of Atlantic world. The reconstruction and revival of traditional African American foodways means seed keeping, growing heirlooms and heritage crops, raising heritage breeds and sustainably gathering and maintaining wild flora and fauna that our ancestors relied upon. The responsible exploration of the Southern food heritage demands that the cooks of colonial, federal era and antebellum kitchens and enslaved people’s cabins be honored for their unique role in giving the Southland her mother cuisine. It is important that we not only honor the Ancestors but provide a lifeline to contemporary communities and people of color looking for a better life in the new economy, a way out of the health and chronic illness crisis, and a way to reduce the vast food deserts that plague many of our communities. To honor the food past and provide for the food future is what Michael calls, “culinary justice.”

Bryant Terry

bryant terry resizeBryant Terry is a James Beard Foundation Leadership Award-winning chef, educator, and author renowned for his activism to create a healthy, just, and sustainable food system. He is currently the Chef-in-Residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco where he creates programming that celebrates the intersection of food, farming, health, activism, art, culture, and the African Diaspora. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, and All Things Considered among many other publications. Fast Company magazine named Bryant one of “9 People Who Are Changing the Future of Food” in their April 2016 issue.

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