Toni Rembe Freedom Theater

The Toni Rembe Freedom Theater features two documentary films by Oliver Hardt about Architect & Designer David Adjaye, whose exhibition Urban Africa is on view on our first floor. See details below. These films loop throughout the day during normal visiting hours at MoAD.

This Building Will Sing for All of UsTHIS BUILDING WILL SING FOR ALL OF US

British-Ghanaian architect David Adjaye and the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

A Film by Oliver Hardt, Germany, 2013, 28:40 min.

Synopsis
The founding and realization of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and
Culture is a milestone in the history of the recognition of black culture in America. For David Adjaye,
the commission to design this iconic building is one of the defining projects in his young career as an
architect. It is, in fact, a realization of a dream.
The film focuses on the question of how Adjaye deals with the challenge of building one of the most
important buildings in African American history. What role does “African” play in the idea of “African
American?” And in what way could the concept for this museum serve as a blueprint for museums in
the 21st century? In the course of discussing these important questions, the film explores some of the
fundamental sources of inspiration of Adjaye´s visionary work.

adjaye-collaborationsDAVID ADJAYE – COLLABORATIONS

A portrait of the architect through the eyes of others

A film by Oliver Hardt, Germany 2015, Digital HD video, 48:00 min.

Synopsis
David Adjaye – Collaborations is a feature length documentary on the work of the acclaimed British-
Ghanaian architect. The film features interviews with Adjaye´s collaborators, a roster of influential
figures in the art and cultural world as well as a significant number of his architectural projects,
including public buildings, residential houses, artist studios and exhibition spaces globally situated
and developed over the past 15 years.
The collaborators – artists, curators and writers, most of them interviewed ‘on site’ – give creative
insights into Adjaye’s buildings, while also offering highly personal perspectives on the particular
collaboration. By looking at the work through the eyes of others, the understanding of the architectural
approach is enhanced, personalized and broadened to encompass a wider discourse.