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MoAD Teens

Diaspora Stories Project 2022
Diaspora Stories Project is a 2-part paid program where Bay Area youth explore their identities in relation to their diaspora stories and influence the future of museum youth programming.

Thank you to all MoAD Teens from this years' Diaspora Stories Project!

MoAD Teens: Diaspora Stories Project is a 2-part paid program where Bay Area youth explore their identities in relation to their diaspora stories and influence the future of museum youth programming.

MoAD worked with dedicated Bay Area students from grades 10, 11, and 12 who are committed to documenting diaspora stories in the Bay Area. During their participation, the youth worked collaboratively with Black art professionals on learning, investigating, and exploring their connection to their individual stories through the lens of digital photography and podcasting.

The youth participants were paid and received a transportation stipend. The summer program, including training, occurred between June 20, 2022, and July 22, 2022, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, from 11:30 am - 3:30 pm. Work was completed in-person and virtually with a culmination event held at the Museum of the African Diaspora.

Diaspora Stories Project Podcasts:

Black Comics: From Equality to Eternity

In this episode, we will focus on two different artists from two different time periods that use the same medium to deliver their messages. Morrie Turner is a Black comic book artist who created a Black and multi-racial comic strip called “Wee Pals.” Nyame Brown is an artist who connects Blackness to the future. We will explore how their art brought People of Color into the comic world, and how their art affected the Bay Area. 

Racialized Bodies in Dance

In this episode, we will explore the life and legacy of the late Ruth Beckford, a dancer and choreographer from Oakland, CA. We also interviewed Raissa Simpson, the founder of PUSH dance company in San Francisco, CA. Both dancers mainly focus on serving their community and using their work to get involved in social and political issues that affect the African Diaspora. During the interview, Raissa talks about the perception of the Black body in dance as unrefined and unprofessional. We also discussed how Black bodies are harmed through racial injustice, policing, and everyday life as People of Color interact with the world around them. "In the performing arts world, the body is neutral, but the bodies that everyone considers neutral are the bodies of the White dancers," Raissa explains. “Racialized bodies are those that are unable to find neutral due to how they are perceived."

The Quirkiness of a Palette Knife

Have you ever wondered how aspects of one’s life and problems in the real world translate into popular art? In this episode of Diaspora Stories Project, we will explore the similarities and differences between Claude Clark and Tiffany Conway, two artists who appear to have very similar styles. We got the chance to interview Conway and talk about the emotions, planning, and storytelling behind her style. Continue listening to find out how Tiffany Conway’s work helps us better understand Claude Clark and see how style evolves over time.

Sponsored by The NBA Foundation and San Francisco Unified School District

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